Picture Book

Can You Snore Like a Dinosaur? by Monica Sweeney

Can You Snore Like a Dinosaur book Cover: two long neck dinosuars nuzzle a baby nestled between them"Can you yawn like a Pteranodan?"

This self-designated "Help-Your-Child-to-Sleep Book" offers illustrations of sleepy dinosaurs as a backdrop for its quiet interactive text. With tips from a certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant, this book offers struggling parents a guide to help settle down rombitious young ones. Encourage your child to do as the dinosaurs do- fall sleep. Young dinosaur fans, particularly those between ages 2 and 5, will find this a perfect bedtime story.

Find Can You Snore Like a Dinosaur? in the Library

Celeste Kids World

Du Iz Tak? by Carson Ellis

Du Iz Tak? book cover featuring two insects looking at a sprouting plant. the title is in a speech bubble apparently said by the bug on the left"Iz tak unk gladdenboot?" "Unk gladdenboot!"

This 2017 Caldecott Honor picture book leaves a lot to the imagination. Written entirely in seemingly nonsense words, readers follow a group of bugs discover, celebrate, and eventually abandon a flower throughout its life cycle. Half of the fun of this title is guessing what each bug is saying and what each nonsense word means, what part of language it is, and perhaps making up nonsense dialogue of your own. The other half of the fun is reveling in the wonderful illustrations and learning to connect pictures to text no matter their meaning. Without being heavy handed, Du Iz Tak? hands each reader a lesson in language and storytelling they are sure to never forget!

This title is wonderful for older preschool and younger elementary school students alike, with each age group garnering a different lesson from the text and illustrations.

Find Du Iz Tak? in the Library.

Brittany, Kids World

Leave Me Alone! By Vera Brosgol

Leave Me AloneShe packed up her things in a big sack, and as she left she shouted back…LEAVE ME ALONE.

With her huge family in the way, their Grandmother can’t get one bit of knitting done before winter comes. So after making her bed, sweeping the floor, and packing her things, she sets out on a quest to be left alone to finish her work. Apparently this task is easier said than done, because each new group of distractions is more annoying than the last!

Young kids with their parents will enjoy yelling ‘Leave Me Alone’ together as they read the story aloud. Short and sweet but full of fun, I can’t recommend this book highly enough.

Find Leave Me Alone! in the Library

Naomi, Kids World

How This Book Was Made by Mac Barnett

How This Book Was Made: an illustrated tiger, hamburger, and storm cloud are in the center with pages and paper all aroundThe first draft of this book was not so good. Neither was the second draft. Or the third. Or the twelfth.

Want to learn how this book got made? Here we go! There are tigers, editors, pirates, illustrations, astronauts, machines, lots of waiting, and an eagle. You got all that? But even after all that, it’s still not a real book. Can you guess what’s still missing?

“How This Book Was Made” is a great read-aloud for parents to share where reality and fantasy collide, making this book just plain fun. Introducing the basics and expectations for aspiring writers and readers as to how books come about, this ‘instructional’ is far from boring!

Find How This Book Was Made in the Library

Naomi, Kids World

A Bike Like Sergio’s by Maribeth Boelts

A Bike Like Sergio's book cover: illustration of a book riding a bicycle with another walking behind“I wish,” I say, but I know that wishes won’t make money appear.

Sergio has a really great bike. Ruben only wishes he had a bike at all. With his birthday near, Ruben knows that even if he asked for a bike, his family could never afford it. In his despair, Ruben sees a lady drop a dollar bill at the grocery store. Snapping it up fast, Ruben is shocked to find out when he gets home that it’s actually a one hundred dollar bill. Maybe Ruben will get that bike for his birthday after all?

Each day our children are faced with many choices, and the courage it takes to do what’s right doesn’t always come easy. In A Bike Like Sergio’s, Ruben has a difficult decision to make. Using his own reasoning, and a little time, Ruben ultimately finds a non-fairytale ending that doesn’t sugarcoat the realities of life, but rather celebrates doing the right thing above all else. This picture book is recommended for lower and mid-elementary students.

Find A Like Like Sergio's in the Library

Naomi, Kids World

Bring Me A Rock! by Daniel Miyares

Bring me a rock book cover: five various sized bugs are holding up a rock upon which a grasshopper stands on top"BRING ME A ROCK! THE BIGGER THE BETTER."

In an Aesop reminiscent of Seuss' Yertle the Turtle, Grasshopper is King of the bugs and he wants a giant throne of rocks...now!
Beetle, Mantis and Centipede all bring the biggest rocks they can find; but, will the littlest bug's pebble be enough?

Told through dialogue and a modern; but, naturalistic art style, Bring Me A Rock! makes the perfect canvas for reading out loud or becoming one of a child's first picture books to read on their own.

Find Bring Me A Rock! in the Library

Jennifer, Kids World

Sophie’s Squash Go to School By Pat Zietlow Miller and Anne Wilsdorf

Sophie's Squash Go To School book cover: an illustration of young girl in pigtails walking on road towards school building with a squash in each arm and wearing a backpack“Sometimes growing a friend just takes time.”

Sophie’s parents said she’d have fun at school. But she didn’t. The chairs were uncomfortable, the milk tasted funny, nobody appreciated her two squash friends Bonnie and Baxter, and Steven just won’t leave her alone! Sophie isn’t interested in making new friends when she already has her squash friends from her garden. But what happens when her food friends start to rot?

School is a huge part of children’s lives, and along with that come dealing with new friendships. For some children who are sensitive, this is no easy task. In this book, Sophie repeatedly rejects any extension of friendship from other children. Until through her own eyes and experiences, she comes to the conclusion that friends are all different, and in the end, worth it.

Sequel to Sophie's Squash.

Find Sophie's Squash Go to School in the Library

Naomi, Kids World

My Baby Crocodile by Gaetan Doremus

My Baby Crocodile book cover: line coloring illustrations of a reddish crocodile holding a knight whose head armor makes him resemble the crocodile"He may be a bit different, but I’ll protect him. He’s my baby after all."

Stumbling across a ‘baby crocodile’ in the swamp, a farsighted but well-meaning crocodile decides to take care of it. This is no simple task since the ‘baby’ is actually a tiny knight wearing armor. Unable to understand why the baby can’t swim, hunt, and even starts to rust after a while, Crocodile tries ever harder to take care of him. But what happens when Crocodile realizes his mistake?

This picture book has a wonderful message of acceptance no matter what you are, or where you’re from. Riddled with mistaken well-meaning, amusing misunderstandings. The Baby Crocodile even addresses the conflict of those who struggle to understand and learn about others they might be confused by. We all may be different, and that’s okay. What matters is what we decide to make of it. Great read-out-loud for pre-school and early elementary families to share.

Find My Baby Crocodile in the Library

Naomi, Kids World

School's First Day of School by Adam Rex

School's First Day of School book cover: illustrations of a school building with houses around it and children in front of it“It's the first day of school at Frederick Douglass Elementary and everyone's just a little bit nervous, especially... the school.”

Have you ever considered how the school feels about the first day of school? This school, newly built, has no idea what to think about "children" coming but it soon finds out and learns a lot in one day.

I recommend this book for kids ages 3 - 10 who are just starting school or switching to a "new" school. Readers of all ages will enjoy the humor of the familiar back-to-school tale voiced from the school building's point of view.  

Find School's First Day in the Library

Mary Jo, Kids World

My Old Pal, Oscar by Amy Hest

My Old Pal Oscar book cover shows an illustration of a bacl and white dog at the beach and a childin a raincoat with a yellow umbrella playing in the surf"Hello, you."
"No tags."
"No name."

While building a sandcastle on the beach an unlikely visitor joins a young boy. A small puppy, with no collar, hops up on to the boy's castle and just watches, the pup appears to be a stray.  This doesn't faze the boy as he simply walks away. The young boy had already once had a dog, the best dog he could possibly have, his name was Oscar. Oscar had  already won the boy's heart and still had it even tho he had passed. The boy thought that no one else could ever take his old pal', Oscar's, place. The small puppy with "big black eyes," is relentless and keeps finding his way back to the boy.

My Old Pal Oscar is a touching story about a boy learning how to open his heart up once again, after the loss of his first dog. Through the story the reader can see how much love an owner may have for their pet; and one may never replace the original, but someone can come along and patch up their heart. This read is recommended for a family read-a-loud with younger elementary school kids who loves dogs, or for anyone that has lost a pet.

Find My Old Pal Oscar in the Library

Gilly, Kids World

Pages