Kids World

Big Friends by Linda Sarah & Benji Davies

Big Friends book cover: image of three friends in a soapbox derby car going down a hill“Two cardboard boxes,
big enough to sit in, hide inside.”

Birt and Etho know that all you need to have fun is this: a friend and a big cardboard box. The friends spend their days on Sudden Hill imagining grand adventures with the help of their boxes. Their "two-by-two rhythm" is unparalleled. That is, until Shu shows up on Sudden Hill one day, toting his very own cardboard box. The dynamic duo becomes a troubled trio when Birt, feeling alienated, smashes his box to pieces and stops going to the hill. Will Etho and Shu go on adventures without Birt, or will Birt come to see that friends and adventures are even better when shared?

The whimsy of childhood play is captured spectacularly in charming painted illustrations, and a "the more the merrier" messages shines. Recommended for all readers in preschool through approximately third grade, especially those who may be having a difficult time sharing a best friend.

Find Big Friends in the Library.

Brittany, Kids World

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is ready for checkout!

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child book cover: a child curled up on itself in what appears to be a bird's nest and wings coming outMany readers may recall that the epilogue of the last Harry Potter book shows Harry's son, Albus Serverus, taking the train to his first year at Hogswarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. (If the readers do not recall, fans of the movie might...) Fans of magic and Hogswarts have now been invited back into Harry Potter's life once again. Albus is at Hogswarts and is struggling with the weight of his father's legacy.

This play script is written by Jack Thorne is based upon a short story accredited to J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, and Jack Thorne.

Eisenhower Library's copies of the script are now available for checkout. Holds may be placed on the circulating copies in our general collections. However, residents of Norridge and Harwood Heights are welcome to select a copy from our Eisenhower Exclusive Collection. These copies are not holdable, but they are available for checkout to residents who visit the Library. Eisenhower Exclusives will be listed in our online catalog as "EE," and are on the pyramid displays in Library Services by the checkout desk.

Residents who prefer e-books to the print copies are welcome to place a hold, checkout, and download an e-copy through the Overdrive app. Feel free to stop in at the Kids desk for help setting up or navigating our digital collections.

Find Harry Potter and the Cursed Child in the Library.

Celeste, Kids World

Run for Your Life!: Predators and Prey on the African Savanna by Lola Schaefer

Run For Your Life book cover: illustration of a zebra running from 2 hyenasIt's a real-life game of hide-and-seek.”

The savannah animals are sleeping under the big night sky as this day-in-the-life story begins and ends. In between, each two-page spread shows and names a specific African pedator and its prey as they run in pursuit and in fear. The watercolors are engaging, the animals a bit cartoonish with hungry and/or fearful eyes. The simple text builds and maintains a sense of excitement with distinct action verbs; the animals don't run but spring, bound, swoop, hop, lunge, and trot.

Readers from 4 to 94 will enjoy this quick read, either as a lap-sit or shared with a group, Older kids and adults will appreciate the detailed back matter, a brief explanation of camoflauge and speed and a list of the animals and their average sprint speeds. (Note: the real-life gore, killing and flesh consumption is only implied, not depicted nor discussed.)

Find Run for Your Life! in the Library

Mary Jo, Kids World

The Girl in the Well is Me by Karen Rivers

The Girl in the Well is Me book cover: from point of view of someone in well, the brocks circle around the cover showing a blue sky in the open circle and the silhouettes of three girls looking down"Where are You?... YOU GUYS. Don't leave me!"

Kammie's life is in turmoil. Her family (minus her father) just moved to a new town, her brother is angry all the time, and she has to share an ugly orange room with him. Without anything familiar and comforting to hang onto, Kammie is desparate to fit in, and three girls have taken advantage of it. The story opens with an "initiation" into a fake club. The girls' trick  goes horribly wrong and Kammie is trapped in an old well, hurt, and alone.

The story unfolds from Kammie's perspective. The combination of hallucinations, memories, and facts makes the otherwise basic plot complex and enthralling. The sense of danger is heightened as Kammie loses more of reality and begins to ramble. This emotional ride is one you can hardly put down as the ending often seems uncertain. Perfect for upper elementary school readers who are looking for a quick read with a satisfying depth.
This book will also serve well as a great discussion into bullying.

Find The Girl in the Well is Me in the Library

Celeste, Kids World

Where's the Elephant? by Barroux

Where's the Elephant? book cover scene of the forest with various animals hidden among the leaves“Where's the elephant?
Where's the parrot?
Where's the snake?”

Take a look at the big, colorful forest and do your best to find the elephant, the parrot, and the snake. With each turn of the page, the forest shrinks smaller and smaller as the encroaching buildings grow taller and taller. With no forest left to hide behind, the trio of animals find themselves trapped behind the bars of a zoo. Will the animals ever be free again, or will the new city hold them hostage in its concrete jungle? And what will become of the earth without its forests?

Mimicking a search and find format, this title features brightly colored painted illustrations that grow starker as the animals' freedom becomes more and more limited. Serving as a wonderful jumping off point for discussions on the environment and deforestation, this title is recommended for all readers in preschool through approximately first grade, especially for animal lovers and budding environmentalist.

Find Where's the Elephant? in the Library

Brittany, Kids World

Paper Wishes by Lois Sepahban

Paper Wishes book cover: a girl with hand up watching a sheet of paper flyingJapan has just bombed Pearl Harbor. This single action is the spark that forces thousands of Japanese American citizens from their homes to internment camps. Ten year old Minami has to leave her island home and everything behind to go to the mainland camp. There is so much she has to leave behind, even her beloved dog Yujiin. Unwilling to leave Yujiin Manimi desperately attempts to sneak him into the camp but right when they reach the mainland he is disovered. Racked with guilt of Yujiin being abandoned leaves Manimi unable speak for many months. With only paper and pencil Manimi attempts to convey her wishes on paper and sends them on the wind for Yujiin to find them. This is a story of forgiveness, overcoming obstacles and a time in history not so far away from where we are now.

This book may appeal to kids in grades 4-6 who enjoy historical fiction, WWII homefront stories, and books about dogs.

Find Paper Wishes in the Library.

Tiffany, Kids World

A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Fairies Primer by Jennifer Adams

A Midsummer Night's Dream a fairy primer book cover: a fairy lies on her stomach on a crescent moon"There sleeps Titania sometime of the night, lull'd in these flowers with dances and delight;"

Beginning readers can meet the fairies of Shakespeare's famous play, A Midsummer Night's Dream.
Filled with bright and whimsical digital artwork and some famous quotes in Shakespeare's original wording,
this sturdy board book is the perfect size for one on one reading sessions.

A good choice for literary parents who want to introduce the classics early, those who need a quiet book before
bed or anyone who needs just a touch of magic in their everyday reading.

Find A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Fairies Primer in the Library

Jennifer, Kids World

Horrible Bear! By Ame Dyckman

Horrible Bear“Bear got an idea. It was a Horrible Bear idea.”

Mistakes are easy for anyone to make, and I mean anyone. A young girl and a bear cross paths through a misunderstanding, leading them to both think the other to be horrible. But is that really the truth?

Parents will love the social skills that ‘Horrible Bear’ teaches in a fun and engaging way. From making a mistake, to saying sorry, it also covers what to do when accidents happen and how to mend relationships. Very young readers will enjoy reading parts of the book aloud with their adult, there is plenty of opportunity to yell ‘Horrible Bear!’ or ‘RAWR!’ together for added fun.

Find Horrible Bear! in the Library.

Naomi, Kids World

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