graphic novel

Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Carl Bowen & Daniel Ferran

The stange case of dr jekyll and mr hyde book cover. A man's profile cut in half. One side shows a man in Victorian suit the other side shows a green muscular monster with a hat on."It happened some months ago, late at night in the Soho neighborhood."

Meet kindly Dr. Jekyll and horrific Mr. Hyde, two men who are so different...or are they? The answer is so bizarre, that readers need to see it to believe it.

Retold in a graphic novel format with lush Victorian illustrations, this edition is perfect for readers from grade 4th and up, as well as those with a taste for classic literature.

Find The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in the Library.

Jennifer, Kid's World

My Little Pony Omnibus Volume 1 by Katie Cook and Heather Nuhfer

My Little Pony Friendship is Magic Omnibus Volume 1: Six of the my little pony characters are on a dirt road, grass and trees on either side"Silly scary lady, friendship is stronger than fear will ever be!"

Welcome back to Ponyville, comic book style. Follow the new stories of Applejack, Fluttershy, Rainbow Dash, Rarity, Pinkie Pie, and Twilight Sparkle (Spike too!) as they fight against the forces of evil that threaten the land of Equestria once more. Using the magic of friendship the Mane Six battle against old and new foes alike, but when one of their own turns to the darkness can they still manage to save the day?

My Little Pony Omnibus is a graphic novel collection with a lot of text, and fans of the show will notice an overall darker tone. Grades 3-6 would be very comfortable reading this solo, but the younger ones will need help. Parents will have fun spotting the pop-culture references hiding in each issue. (Blues Brothers Ponies, I’m looking at you.)

Find My Little Pony Omnibus Volume 1 in the Library

Naomi, Kids World

El Deafo by Cece Bell

El Deafo book cover: a bunny in white t-shirt and blue shorts is flying through the air among the clouds with a red cape trailing behind“With or without superpowers, I am still El Deafo --- and I am outraged!”

If you enjoyed Raina Telgemeier’s Smile, you will also love El Deafo.  With a similar funny and sweet style, this graphic novel tells the story of Cece from age four through fifth grade.  Because the voice is so authentic, you will know right away that this is Bell’s personal growing-up story.  Cece loses her hearing when she is four years old.  Well-intentioned adults and friends constantly interfere with what Cece wants most of all --- to just be treated like everyone else.  She deals with school and relationships (and develops her strong sense of self) by transmuting her embarrassing hearing devices into superpowers, thus imagining herself a superhero.  Her memoir shows us that we all share this superpower --- coping in the life we get.

This graphic novel memoir is recommended for grades 3 – 6 and older.  Just a few weeks ago, it received a 2015 Newbery Honor Award.

Find El Deafo in the Library.

Mary Jo, Kids World

Hilda and the Black Hound by Luke Pearson

Hilda and the Black Hound book cover: graphic novel cover featuring a girl with blue hair, large eyes, and a mouth open as if screaming or gasping. A white furry animal in next to her and both are above images of buildings. The black shadow behind them resembles a large black dog."I already knew that you're the kindest, bravest, most selfless little girl it's possible to be."

This graphic novel tells Hilda’s fantastic story through speech bubbles and moody panel images. Her “real” and imagined experiences blend and overlap as we follow blue-haired Hilda on her quest.  She and her dog, Twig, want to find and protect the misunderstood house elf, Tontu.  A wild, giant wolfhound is roaming through Trolberg and Hilda is influenced by the fear pervading her town.

But outsider Tontu leads Hilda through the hidden world, which humans don’t see.  Hilda then solves the wolf mystery and saves the day.  Hilda’s personality and actions reminds us what kind of a person to be in a bad situation.

Part of the Hildafolk series, this book is recommended for readers age 8 – 99 who wish there really were little folk living inside their walls.

Look for Hilda and the Black Hound in the Library.

Mary Jo, Kids World

Hidden by Loic Dauvillier

Hidden Book cover: blue background, title in white text along bottom. Brown haired girl is looking down at the yellow star on her red jacket"Some people suggested that we become a family of sheriffs...There aren't any sheriffs in France."

The story of the treatment of the French Jews during WWII is related through the eyes of a young girl, "Dounia," and is narrated by the grandmother the girl grows up to be. The child's experience is very relatable and the older narrator's voice breaks in just enough to explain the intangible to her granddaughter (and the reader).

"Your daddy was a liar!" "My daddy didn't want to hurt me. He made up that story to protect me."

The two-point perspective allows the graphic novel to have just enough of the dark elements to stress the seriousness of its subject matter while staying appropriately hopeful for a 3rd grader. The art successfully brings the harsh and scary subject to its intended audience by using a darker palette where appropriate, but not lingering there in the shadows. Likewise, the author gives a reader an ending that is as happy as it can be while still being realistic.

Thought provoking and a good discussion starter.

Find Hidden in the Library

Celeste, Kids World

Zebrafish by Sharon Emerson

Cover image of Zebrafish featuring teen band members holding musical instruments on a green background."If we think we're a band, we become a band!"
 
This graphic novel centers on Vita, the “new girl” with purple hair, as she forms a band and a new group of friends.  The band mates, each with his or her own personality, style and backstory, combine their talents to create a music video.  Things don't go exactly as planned when they perform at school but their effort becomes much more meaningful than just another night of rock and roll fun.    
 
Perfect for 5th-8th graders, the story is told completely through dialogue, including puns and pop culture references that tweens will enjoy.  The cartoon-style illustrations include subtle, fun details relating to life as an American teenager.  Adults are almost non-existent here, another factor in how relatable tweens and young teens will find this book.
 
 
Mary Jo, Kids World

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