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Commonwealth by Ann Patchett

Monday, August 07, 7:00 – 8:30 PM.

This month’s Adult Book Discussion book will be Commonwealth by Ann Patchett.

One Sunday afternoon, Bert Cousins shows up at Franny Keating’s christening party uninvited. Before evening falls, he has kissed Franny’s mother, setting in motion the dissolution of their marriages and the joining of two families. Spanning five decades, Commonwealth explores how this chance encounter reverberates through the lives of the four parents and six children involved.

Copies of the book will be available at the Library Services Desk approximately a month before our discussion.

Book | Large Print | eBook | Audiobook CD | Download Audiobook

Real Friends by Shannon Hale

Real Friends book cover; illustrated 7 girls of varying ethnicty in the front a red headed girl with glasses"When I was little, I didn't worry about friends."

Before you start school, having friends isn't a problem. But if you're like Shannon, friends aren't always easy to come by once you start your academic career. Never quite fitting in yet never exactly standing out, Shannon's kindergarten-through-fifth-grade experience with friends and frenemies is one many school-aged children will relate to. Whether trouble comes from shyness, anxiety, bullying, or just plain being different, Real Friends proves that it's not about finding friends, but finding out who your real friends are.

This graphic novel will win the hearts of readers in upper-elementary and middle school who enjoy the works of Raina Telgemeier (Smile), Cece Bell (El Deafo), and Victoria Jamieson (Roller Girl).

Find Real Friends in the Library.

Brittany, Kids World

The Goldfish Boy by Lisa Thompson

Goldfish Boy book cover: blue house silhouette of boy looking out the window"At some point after 12:55 p.m. on that bright, scorching day, Teddy Dawson went missing."

In the middle of a cul-de-sac in a small English town there lies Matthew Corbin, a boy who refuses to leave his house. He has OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) where he has to wash his hands multiple times a day and has to make sure his bedroom is clean and germ-free. In his spare time (which is a lot), Matthew looks out his window where he can take note of his neighbor's daily activities.

But when a toddler next door goes missing, it’s up to Matthew (will he leave his house?) and some unlikely friends to help him solve the mystery. Did one of the neighbors take Teddy? Did he run off on his own?

The shining light of the book is the refreshing take of a boy suffering from OCD and how it dictates his life. The readers will root for Matthew as he tries to deal with his disorder while solving the mystery. Although the mystery plot is not new, it did keep me on my toes as I tried to figure out what happened to Teddy.

All upper elementary and middle school readers who love mysteries should take a look at this book!

Find The Goldfish Boy at the Library.

Victoria, Kids World

Carrot & Pea by Morag Hood

Carrot and Pea: An Unlikely Friendship book cover- illustrated green peas fil the page with one orange carrot stick"Colin isn't at all like Lee and the other peas."
"He is much too tall and much too orange."

Lee and Colin are so different. Lee is a pea: little, round, and green. Colin is a carrot: large, rectangular, and orange. All of Lee's friends are peas, except for Colin. Not only does Colin not look like Lee and his pea friends, but he cannot do many of the things peas can do like roll or bounce. However, Colin can do many things the peas cannot. Will the peas accept Colin for who he is, even though he is not the same as them?

These simple illustrations in this story of friendship and acceptance make detecting round peas as different from orange carrots fun for those just learning shapes and colors, and funny for those already in the know. This title is best for birth through out preschool and readers who are learning about being accepted and accepting.

Find Carrot & Pea: An Unlikely Friendship in the Library.

Brittany, Kids World

My Name is Lucy Barton

Monday, July 10, 7:00 – 8:30 PM.

This month’s Adult Book Discussion book will be My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout.

Lucy Barton is recovering slowly from what should have been a simple operation. Her mother, to whom she hasn’t spoken for many years, comes to see her. Gentle gossip about people from Lucy‘s childhood in Amgash, Illinois, seems to reconnect them, but just below the surface lay the tension and longing that have informed every aspect of Lucy‘s life. Knitting this powerful narrative together is the brilliant storytelling voice of Lucy herself: keenly observant, deeply human, and truly unforgettable.

Copies of the book will be available at the Library Services Desk approximately a month before our discussion.

Book | Large Print | eBook | Audiobook CD | Download Audiobook

Tales of Sasha: The Big Secret by Alexa Pearl

Tales of Sasha: The Big Secret book cover: an illustrated grey horse on a lush cliff looking up into the sky"Sometimes, I feel like I'm standing at the starting line of a race, waiting for the whistle to blow."

Sasha is a small plucky young horse who just doesn't fit into the herd. She admits, "I stink at staying still," and her classmates know she is more prone to daydreams than focusing on her teacher. Downhearted and depressed after failing a school lesson, Sasha's parents let her in on a little secret that has the potential to change everything.

With less than 100 pages and illustrations on every page, this series opener is a tidy little transitional chapter book perfect for early elementary readers just making the jump into chapter books. My Little Pony fans will find the artwork appealing, and kids who struggle sitting still will find in Sasha a kindred spirit.

Find Tales of Sasha: The Big Secret in the Library

Celeste, Kids World

Freedom Over Me by Ashley Bryan

Freedom Over Me book cover: title is encircled with chains, within each loop the face of an African slave is pictured."I was enslaved in Central Africa. In chained coffles, I survived the long walk to the coast."

After reading an 1828 estate appraisement listing only the names, ages, and prices of a family's slaves, author Ashley Bryan decided to bring these forgotten souls to life, giving each their own story and dreams using free-form poems. Weaving the eleven people together through marriage, friendship, or mere shared servitude, a community emerges and just how grave and dehumanizing the conditions of slavery were comes to light. Each fictionalized account of a real person merits reflection on how the institution of slavery gravely affected our brothers and sisters in the past, and how it still affects us today.

The illustrations bring life to each fictionalized story in a way that is not too juvenile for its target audience, but could be easily emulated by any young artists who happen to be reading. This book is recommended for readers in grades 3-6 and would pair flawlessly with Laurie Halse Anderson's Seeds of America trilogy.

Find Freedom Over Me in the Library.

Brittany, Kids World

Swatch: The Girl Who Loved Color by Julia Denos

Swatch book cover: an illustrated girl in long grey pants and gray and white striped long-sleeved shirt with color dots trailing behind her"Her name was Swatch, and she was a color tamer."

Do you have a hard time choosing just one color to call your favorite? Then meet Swatch. This young girl collects breathtaking colors from all over and places them in jars. One day, she stumbles upon the color she hasn't yet collected: yellow. But yellow doesn't want to be tamed. Will Swatch continue to try and tame yellow, or will she let it roam free?

This picture book is perfect for exposing pre-kindergarten students to a beautiful array of colors. It will be sure to capture their attention with its vibrant artwork.

Find Swatch: The Girl Who Loved Color in the Library

Aseel, Kids World

Can You Snore Like a Dinosaur? by Monica Sweeney

Can You Snore Like a Dinosaur book Cover: two long neck dinosuars nuzzle a baby nestled between them"Can you yawn like a Pteranodan?"

This self-designated "Help-Your-Child-to-Sleep Book" offers illustrations of sleepy dinosaurs as a backdrop for its quiet interactive text. With tips from a certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant, this book offers struggling parents a guide to help settle down rombitious young ones. Encourage your child to do as the dinosaurs do- fall sleep. Young dinosaur fans, particularly those between ages 2 and 5, will find this a perfect bedtime story.

Find Can You Snore Like a Dinosaur? in the Library

Celeste Kids World

Midnight Without a Moon by Linda Williams Jackson

Midnight Without a Moon book cover: the back of an African girl looking at a house in the distance. Cotton plants surround the cover"But in Mississippi you never knew what little thing could spark a flame and get you killed. Registering to vote. Voting. Or even something as little as whistling at a white woman."

 Jim Crow laws are still affecting Mississippi in 1955 as with the rest of the Deep South. African American's are legally free, but in Mississippi the color of your skin still means everything. Rose Lee Carter, the 13 year-old African-American narrator shares her dreams of moving out of her grandparent's sharecropper house and to live up north. But to where? To Chicago, where her Mama left her and her brother for a husband and a new set of kids? Or to St. Louis with her Aunt Belle, a Civil Rights activist that supports the controversial NAACP?

Throughout the book we read about racism in the South and how some African Americans like Rose Lee's grandmother are content with their lives working for a white family and okay with the law that deemed, "separate but equal". But, Rose Lee Carter and those in her community are forced to see things differently when an African American boy, Emmett Till, is found murdered for allegedly whistling at a white woman.
 
Would you stand up for what you believe in even if you might be killed? Or would you stay in the shadows and hope that nothing changes?

Rose's voice comes through as a witty and intelligent young girl that tries to see hope in the darkest places. This heart-felt, but raw historical novel is recommended for sixth grade and up.

Find Midnight Without a Moon in the Library.

Victoria, Kids World

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